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Phil Klaus

Portait de Phil Klaus
Statut(s) Professeur (full professor)
École International University of Monaco
Date de recrutement 15.06.2016
Axe de recherche Inseec U Création & Innovation
Axe de recherche International University of Monaco Innovative luxury experience and emerging patterns of consumption
Portait de Phil Klaus

Publications

    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    Measuring customer experience quality: The EXQ scale revisited

    Marketing has recently shown considerable interest in customer experience (CX). Klaus and Maklan (2012, 2013) provided a scale, called EXQ, to measure CX quality. In 2014, Klaus presented an updated EXQ scale that challenged the conceptualization and operationalization of CX quality. Inspired by this new conceptualization, we take the next step in the new EXQ scale’s application by, first, drawing on data from a B2C and a B2B study to systematically explore the scale’s psychometric properties. We find that the EXQ scale comprises two or more dimensions rather than one. In a second step, we explore the nature of the relationships between these dimensions, as well as between the dimensions and their items. Our research replicates previous findings and takes a step toward generalizing the new EXQ scale. This advancement increases our understanding of the role that CX quality plays in different research settings.

    • Co-auteur(s) Kuppelwieser V.G., Klaus P.
    • Revue(s) Journal of Business Research Available
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    The End of The World as We Know It? The Influence of Online Channels on the Luxury Customer Experience

    Luxury brands claim to offer consumers pleasure and prestige and deliver high profits to retailers. While the global demand for luxury goods is increasing, consumers expect that the purchasing process these goods will accommodate their preferences on how, where, and when they want to purchase them. The changing nature of luxury markets and customers’ purchasing behavior makes it necessary to understand why customers would choose an online channel to purchase luxury offerings. What are the features that make so appealing, attracting consumers towards them? Our study explores customers’ motivations, the benefits and the experiences they are expecting and perceiving from the Online Customer Experience (OLX). We examine the OLX and propose three corresponding luxury customer segments, the purists, opportunists, and e-lux.

    • Revue(s) Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 2
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    Moving the Customer Experience Field Forward: Introducing the Touchpoints, Context, Qualities (TCQ) Nomenclature

    In response to initial voices that put the customer experience (management) (CX(M) hereafter) movement into question, this paper aims to introduce a formal nomenclature to push the CX(M) field toward a more mature state. First, drawing from an inductive analysis of 143 CX(M) papers, the authors identify twelve basic CX components which aggregate into three overarching building blocks - touchpoints (T – i.e., points of interaction between the customer and brand/firm), context (C – i.e., situationally available resources internal and/or external to the customer), and qualities (Q – i.e., attributes that reflect the nature of customer responses and reactions to interactions with the brand/firm). The TCQ nomenclature offers a language to make CX actionable, moving beyond the breadth of the current definition and frameworks by disentangling CX into small bite-sized chunks (i.e., the CX components) that any academic and practitioner, regardless of their discipline, may understand and use to discuss and manage CX. Second, using the TCQ nomenclature, the authors assess the current state of the CX(M) literature and identify mature (e.g., firm-controlled touchpoints and cognitive and emotional qualities associated with CX) and underdeveloped (e.g., non-firm controlled touchpoints and the market and environmental context in which CX emerges) areas ripe for future research. In addition, they also provide a set of recommendations to strengthen the methodological rigor of the field. Third, the TCQ nomenclature may support managers in auditing their current CXM practices and/or serve as a basis for CX design and innovation.

    • Revue(s) Journal of Service Research
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 1, CNRS 2
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    AI Voice Bots: A Services Marketing Research Agenda

    To document how AI has changed the way consumers make decisions and propose how that change impacts services marketing, service research, and service management. A review of the literature, documentation of sales, and customer service experiences support the evolution of Bot-driven consumer decision making, proposing the bot-driven service platform as a key component of the service experience. Today the focus is on convenience, the less time and effort, the better. The authors propose that AI has taken convenience to new level for consumers. By using Bots as their service of choice, consumers outsource their decisions to algorithms, hence give little attention to traditional consumer decision making models and brand emphasis. At the moment, this is especially true for low involvement types of decisions, but high involvement decisions are on the cusp of delegating to AI. Therefore, management needs to change how they view consumers’ decision-making-processes and how services are being managed. In an AI-convenience driven service economy the emphasis needs to be on search ranking, or warehouse stock, rather than the traditional drivers of brand values, such as service quality. Customer experience management will shift from interaction with products and services towards interactions with new service platforms, such as AI, Bots. Hence, service marketing, as we know it might be in decline and be replaced by an efficient complex attribute computer decision making model. The change in consumer behavior leads to a change in the service marketing approach needed in the world of AI. The Bot, the new service platform is now in charge of search and choice for many purchase situations.

    • Co-auteur(s) Klaus P., Zaichkowsky J.
    • Revue(s) Journal of Services Marketing
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    Man vs Machine: Examining the Three Themes of Service Robotics in Tourism and Hospitality

    There is a growing need in the tourism and hospitality literature to harmonise service robots and artificial intelligence’s (AI) meaning and foundations, while also offering guidance on future discussions and research. We operationalize MacInnis’ (2011) conceptual contribution to derive insights regarding service robots in the tourism and hospitality domain. This paper adopts an interdisciplinary stance and integrates insights from the tourism, hospitality, philosophy, psychology, sociology, management, robotics, information technology and marketing fields. Service robotics and related tourism and hospitality research follow three basic themes: deployment, acceptance and ethical considerations. The findings on the use of service robotics are subsequently delineated and a summary of the tourism and hospitality field's current research needs is provided.

    • Co-auteur(s) Manthiou K. , Klaus P., Kuppelwieser, V. , Reeves, W.
    • Revue(s) Electronic Markets
    • Classement(s) FNEGE Rank 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    Applying the EEE Customer Mindset in Luxury: Reevaluating Customer Experience Research and Practice During and After Corona

    Purpose - This paper's objective is to raise awareness of how customer experience (CX) research, a key construct of modern-day service research, needs to be revisited in view of the pandemic. Particularly, we examine if CX-related service research constructs, models, and frameworks need to be reevaluated during and after the Corona crisis and if so, how and why? Moreover, this paper contributes to CX research by analyzing the customer mindset and submit a new framework, incorporating three perspectives: emotions, employment, and expectations (EEE).
    Design/methodology/approach - We critically review current CX practices and investigate the impact on how customers perceive services in this time of crisis.
    Findings - Based on this critical analysis, we discuss implications for research and practice with reference to the example of the luxury industry with its historical emphasis on the CX. This discussion leads to related propositions and research directions through Corona and beyond.
    Originality - We investigate the current customer mindset in more detail, which we divide into three main themes: emotions, employment, and expectations (EEE). Our EEE framework will assist companies in addressing the new and changed consumer mindset and how to successfully deliver (virus-alternated) customer experiences
    Keywords: customer experience, luxury, luxury customer experience, luxury management, emotions, employment, expectations, Covid-19

    • Co-auteur(s) Klaus P., Manthiou A.
    • Revue(s) Journal of Service Management
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3, CNRS 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    Placing Dynamics at the Heart of Customer Experience (CX) Research

    Placing Dynamics at the Heart of Customer Experience (CX) Research

    • Co-auteur(s) Prof. Dr. Volker Kuppelwieser
    • Revue(s) Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    REVISITING THE AGE CONSTRUCT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SERVICE RESEARCH

    People in the older consumer segment spend more money on services than those in other segments, making them a desired target for service providers. This universal trend has led researchers to start discussing this trend’s implications for service research and marketing practice. These discussions’ results are ambiguous, because service researchers and managers face the problem of having to choose between three main age constructs: chronological age, cognitive age, and future time perspective (FTP). Unfortunately, current age-related research lacks an understanding of their real value, as only a few studies have combined them to discuss their specific impact. Recognizing this gap in the literature, this article compares the three age constructs in behavioral and perceptional settings. We highlight each age construct’s merits and weaknesses, as well as exploring which construct delivers the best results in which service context. Bayesian analyses of our data reveal that chronological age has its merits as a control variable, but does not sufficiently discriminate between age groups’ behavior and perceptions. Cognitive age is useful if customers’ own age perceptions are included, but only identifies age differences in specific service settings. FTP consistently detects age-related differences in customers’ perceptions and in their behavior in all contexts.

    • Co-auteur(s) Prof. Dr. Volker G. Kuppelwieser , Klaus P.
    • Revue(s) Journal of Service Research
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 1
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    VIEWPOINT: A PRIMER FOR INCLUSIVE SERVICE MARKETING THEORY

    Purpose
    This viewpoint sheds light on an as yet underrepresented consumer group. Considering impaired consumers in our theories would not only change these theories’ meaning, but also add variance. Our theories would therefore develop from a specific case theory to a broadly acceptable and applicable theory.
    Design/methodology/approach
    As a viewpoint paper, this work relies on previously published literature and highlights exemplary shortcomings in the servicescape and customer experience theory.
    Findings
    The paper specifies shortcomings in the current theory development and application. While service marketing scholars consistently consider the normal and representative consumer, changing the customer groups will lead to a broader understanding of consumer behavior.
    Originality/value
    The paper not only highlights impaired consumers’ different needs and expectations, but also discusses the difference between impairment and disability. Given this distinction, the paper calls for further research on such consumers.

    • Co-auteur(s) Kuppelwieser, V. , Klaus P.
    • Revue(s) Journal of Services Marketing
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    Beyond good and bad: challenging the suggested role of emotions in customer experience (CX) research

    Emotions play a key role in customers’ experiences. Our paper challenges several notions regarding emotion’s role and their influence on the customer experience (hereafter CX). Based on our analysis, we develop the following five propositions to advance our understanding of emotions’ role in customer experience research. First, we argue that positive and negative emotions can coexist during the consumption experience. Second, positive emotions do not automatically lead to positive consumption outcomes, and negative emotions may not necessarily generate negative results. Third, positive or negative emotions toward a company employee might not automatically transfer to the company as a whole. Fourth, customers are not apathetic victims of their emotions with no capability to control their emotional experiences. Our last proposition is that consumption emotions are not a purely intrapersonal phenomenon, but that the social context matters and influences the consumption experience. We propose a related future research agenda highlighting opportunities for scholars and managers alike.

    • Co-auteur(s) Akaterini Manthiou, Ellie Hickmann, Klaus P.
    • Revue(s) Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2020

    Man vs Machine: Examining the Three Themes of Service Robotics in Tourism and Hospitality

    There is a growing need in the tourism and hospitality literature to harmonise service robots and artificial intelligence’s (AI) meaning and foundations, while also offering guidance on future discussions and research. We operationalize MacInnis’ (2011) conceptual contribution to derive insights regarding service robots in the tourism and hospitality domain. This paper adopts an interdisciplinary stance and integrates insights from the tourism, hospitality, philosophy, psychology, sociology, management, robotics, information technology and marketing fields. Service robotics and related tourism and hospitality research follow three basic themes: deployment, acceptance and ethical considerations. The findings on the use of service robotics are subsequently delineated and a summary of the tourism and hospitality field's current research needs is provided.

    • Co-auteur(s) Manthiou A. , Klaus P., Kuppelwieser V. , Reeves W.
    • Revue(s) Electronic Markets
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    Customer Engagement in Evolving Technological Environments: Synopsis and Guiding Propositions

    This special issue has explored ways in which consumers engage with brands and firms within ever-evolving technological environments (Ostrom et al., 2015). The articles show how firms adopt an increasingly broad array of emerging technologies to facilitate interactions with their prospects and customers (Letheren et al., 2019; Willems et al., 2019; Dessart et al., 2019 or Marbach et al., 2019 in this issue). New technology can be used at any stage of the marketing process, including during the segmentation, targeting or positioning sub-processes, to support or transform any of the marketing mix elements, thereby affecting consumer engagement with brands (Hollebeek et al., 2014).

    • Co-auteur(s) Hollebeek L., Sprott D.E., Andreassen Tor W., Costley C., Klaus P., Kuppelwieser V., Karahasanovic A., Taguchi T., Islam J., Rather R.
    • Revue(s) European Journal of Marketing
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    Customer Experience (CX), not Brands will be sitting on the Iron Throne

    The author will challenge the ancient “brand-related” thinking, submitting that somehow companies are still in control of what consumers think or even how customers act. As a counterproposition, the author highlights that the only thing companies can manage these days are the experiences customers have with them and their offerings. Supported by our research, I propose to end the chicken-and-egg question of if brands drive the customer experience which is (how CX), or vice versa. I suggest researching the only thing that matters, how CX offerings, and how CX influences the way customer search, collect, and evaluate information and behave. This proposition leads into the implications for the market research community and CX management.

    • Revue(s) International Journal of Market Research
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    The Dawn of Traditional CX Metrics? Examining Satisfaction, EXQ, and WAR

    Customer experience (CX) has evolved into a top priority of business executives worldwide. CX is a key determinant of long-term corporate success. CX research has become commonplace among academics and marketing practitioners alike. Despite CX's omnipresence, scholars and managers cannot agree on the meaning, foundations of CX, and develop enough evidence and tools to demonstrate CX's crucial link to firm performance.

    • Co-auteur(s) Imhof G. , Klaus P.
    • Revue(s) International Journal of Market Research
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    The product is me: Hyper-personalized consumer goods as unconventional luxury

    This study explores hyper-personalized wellness products (e.g., facial serum, custom-prepared meals, vitamins) as unconventional luxury products. Hyper-personalized consumer goods are those in which a consumer's genetic composition, or DNA, is used in the manufacturing process. Given that hyper-personalized products emphasize high quality and uniqueness and garner premium prices, this study conceptualizes these products as representing contemporary, unconventional luxury. Three studies empirically demonstrate the extent to which consumers allocate price premiums to three different hyper-personalized consumer products in terms of functionally compared with a mass-produced equivalent. The results reveal that consumers believe that hyper-personalized products are worth premium prices, regardless of their desire to own these products. Whether hyper-personalized products are truly more beneficial to consumer well-being than their mass-produced counterparts remains unknown however. The article concludes with theoretical and research implications, as well as research directives.

    • Co-auteur(s) Rosenbaum M., Contreras Ramirez G.,, Campbell J., Klaus P.
    • Revue(s) Journal of Business Research
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 2
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    Consumer Responses to Planned Obsolence

    Companies use planned obsolescence as a central marketing strategy to motivate their customers to (re)buy new and upcoming products. These companies try to increase their revenue and profit by reducing the value of a product's older version. While previous literature focuses on companies’ perspectives of strategic choice, economic or ecological impact, and innovation management, this paper highlights the customer's perception of planned obsolescence. In presenting three studies, the paper finds that a planned obsolescence strategy harms customers’ value perception and ultimately their willingness to pay. By adding customer-related evidence to the discussion, the paper questions companies’ planned obsolescence strategies and opens up a potentially rewarding avenue for further research.

    • Co-auteur(s) Volker G Kuppelwieser, Klaus P., Othman Boujena, Aikaterini Manthiou
    • Revue(s) Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Vol. 47, March, pp. 157-165
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Article classé
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    Viewpoint: Conveying Managerial Relevance into Service Research

    This paper aims to propose opportunities on how service research scholars can overcome the challenge of designing, delivering and disseminating managerial relevant studies. The proposed tactics will assist researchers and the community in general to resolve the pressing issues of both, the disconnection between theory formulation and verification and the divide between pursuing theoretical advances versus managerial usefulness.

    • Revue(s) Journal of Services Marketing, Vol. 33, No. 1, pp. 104-111.
    • Classement(s) FNEGE 3

Autres publications

    • Phil Klaus
    • Direction d'une numéro spécial d'une revue académique classée
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    The Future of Customer Experience (CX) in Retailing

    Retailing as we knew it is entering a period of both, transformation, and unprecedented change. New technologies drive digital disruption, omni-channel management, and the customer experience (CX) is commonly seen as the new differentiator and source of gaining a sustainable competitive advantage in the retail environment (Klaus, 2014).
    Artificial intelligence (AI) and other technologies up and down the demand chain have already altered the retail CX and customer journey. This evolution has now been kicked into an even higher gear, and, in conjunction with the pandemic, the demise of traditional ‘brick-and-mortar’ has been tremendously accelerated. Consumers are growing accustomed of the benefits AI and other technologies deliver, subsequently, enhancing their customer experience. Retailers taking advantage of all the data making available to them by trying to deliver the best possible experiences. However, the use of technology also raised customers expectations significantly, and managers struggle to convert data into usable (and valued) insights to deliver on the desired customer experience expectations (Klaus, 2020).
    Ultimately, AI will also have an impact on every aspect of the demand chain, and while the rise of automation in the ‘back office’ is invisible to customers, the impact on employment and society is not (Manthiou et al., 2020). It will become of crucial importance that the retailing industry assist, replace or redeploy their human workers in more value-adding activities. This is easier said than done, given that the more and more consumers are considered ‘convenience addicts’, preferring the online experience over the brick-and-mortar CX (Klaus and Zaichkowsky, 2020). Moreover, more and more consumers value their purchasing interactions with AI, such as Amazon’s Alexa over interaction with ‘unpredictable’ human beings (Klaus and Zaichkowsky, 2020).
    Another trend is consumers rising propensity for sustainable consumption and practices. The question is on how this influence the customer experience practices, and the resulting customer experience. Will managers revert towards more sustainable practices to address this rising propensity If so, yes, and how?
    Looking even further towards the future and the future retailing consumer we need to contemplate which retail experiences ‘Generation AI,’ born after 2010, will value. This consumer segment is being raised within AI’s influence and perceived benefits. AI has been there to support their needs, ambitions, aims, objectives, and desires. Once this generation will start to spend their own money they will look for a different retail experience that mirrors what they are accustomed to. Rather than having to research product specifications, ratings, or prices, they will expect the best offerings being preselected for them. Retailers need to address this by moving from being prescriptive to being a consultant and deliver tailormade suggestions when and where the customer desires it. This indicates shifting the frontline experience from traditional retail settings towards interaction, as already proposed in the luxury industry (Klaus and Manthiou, 2020).
    While omni-channel management, the challenges of new segments, and the use of AI is becoming more and more relevant in the retail field, little research explores if, and how customers use and embrace new channels. Marketing and retailing literature remain mostly silent in prognosing future retailing or considering future developments in their models. Managerial literature does not provide any guidance in addressing this task sufficiently either. Most of the insights and advice consultants and managers are offering on how to manage the retail CX are often anecdotal in nature. In general, they are lacking rigor and the scientific knowledge to explore what constitutes and what drives the retail CX, leaving scholars with plenty of opportunities to contribute to advancing retail customer experience knowledge and management.

    • Revue(s) Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services - FNEGE Rang 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Direction d'une numéro spécial d'une revue académique classée
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    The Ultimate Luxury: Exploring Ultra-High-Net-Worth (UHNW) Individuals’ Motivations and Experiences

    The Ultimate Luxury: Exploring Ultra-High-Net-Worth (UHNW) Individuals’ Motivations and Experiences
    The market for luxury has been growing consistently. In 2018, the luxury segment represented an estimated $1.2 trillion. Academic research reflects the sector growth as rooted in its solid foundation of luxury goods and brands knowledge. Scholars and managers alike emphasize the ever-increasing importance of the luxury experience for understanding and catering to the luxury customer. However, understanding and exploring what constitutes the luxury experience is a challenge. This is in particularly true of ultra-high net-worth individuals (UHNW). While only comprising 220,000 individuals, the ultra-high net-worth (UHNW) segment has a collective net worth of more than $30 trillion. By robustly stimulating the demand for luxury and, therefore, its growth, the UHNW segment has become increasingly important for the luxury industry (Klaus, 2019). Some luxury sectors, such as the market for superyachts - one superyacht sells for an average of $10 million – are exclusively focused on UHNW.
    Despite their collective wealth, UHNWs are a small market in absolute terms – even for niche luxury brands that are created for the most discerning consumers. Though many of these elite organizations covet the patronage of this consumer group for the prestige and spending power they bring, they can be a difficult group to understand and target with effective UHNW luxury marketing initiatives.
    Despite its crucial importance for the luxury sector (Deloitte, 2019), research exploring the ultra-high net-worth (UHNW) population’s experiences is non-existent. An ultra-high net-worth individual (UHNW), defined as those with a minimum net worth of $30 million, is a member of an elite club, representing 0.003% of the global population (Camper & Nicholsons, Wealth X, 2016).
    According to Deloitte (2019), the global luxury market comprises nine segments: personal luxury goods, luxury hospitality, luxury cruises, luxury cars, designer furniture, fine wines and spirits, fine food, private jets and yachts, and fine art, with the latter three targeted almost exclusively at the UHNW segment.
    Researchers agree that hedonic motivations and associated experiences are prevalent in luxury settings, more than in any others (Husic & Cicic, 2009), which has implications for luxury brand and customer experience management (Klaus, 2018; Steenkamp, 2014). Luxury research focuses primarily on four pillars: exclusivity (e.g., Fionda & Moore, 2009), hedonics (e.g., Hagtvedt & Patrick, 2009), product quality (e.g., Vigneron & Johnson, 2004), and price (e.g., Parguel et al., 2016). Although becoming more important for luxury managers (Berghaus et al., 2014) and scholars (Holmqvist et al., 2019), luxury customer experience (CX) research is still underdeveloped. Most luxury CX research is either conceptual by nature (e.g., Ko et al., 2016), explores only the antecedents and the consequences of the experience, as well as related concepts (e.g., Shukla et al., 2016), or focuses on the experience’s experiential aspects rather than on a holistic conceptualization of CX (Lemon & Verhoef, 2016). Most of the insights and advice consultants and managers are offering on how to manage the UHNW CX are, however, anecdotal in nature. In general, they are lacking both, rigor and the scientific knowledge to explore what constitutes and what drives the UHNW CX.

    Contributions
    The special issue will make a clear and significant contribution to the customer experience (CX) luxury, and consumer behavior literature streams. CX is considered a highly significant, but still conceptually developing research construct (e.g., Lemon and Verhoef 2016). While CX is often proposed as a context-specific construct, very little research has been conducted to test this proposition (e.g., Imhof and Klaus 2019). Researchers agree upon that CX is driven by consumers’ emotions and emotional stages. This is in particularly true in the luxury segment (Rosenbaum et al., 2019), yet scholars submit that not all luxury contexts and segments are the same (Klaus, 2018), and both, the CX and the customers’ emotional stages are dynamic in nature and can change over time (De Keyser et al. 2015). As of today, there is to the best of our knowledge, no empirical research done to explore these dynamics, the UHNW CX, and UHNW motivations and benefits they are seeking. Our special issue will address and fill this important research gaps.

    • Revue(s) European Journal of Marketing - FNEGE Rang 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Direction d'une numéro spécial d'une revue académique classée
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    The Future of Customer Experience in Retailing

    Special Issue for the Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services

    • Revue(s) Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services FNEGE Rank 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Direction d'une numéro spécial d'une revue académique classée
    • Création & Innovation
    • Forthcoming

    More than just brands, status, and exclusivity? Exploring the Luxury Experience and Luxury Experience Management

    https://www.jmmnews.com/luxury-experience/

    • Revue(s) Journal of Marketing Management (FNEGE 3, CNRS 3)
    • Phil Klaus
    • Direction d'une numéro spécial d'une revue académique classée
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    A New Me: Going abroad for health and body beautification/modification

    Medical tourism, also called health tourism, surgical tourism, or medical travel, is defined as international travel for the purpose of receiving medical care. Many patients engage in medical tourism because the procedures they seek can be performed in other countries at relatively low cost and without the delay and inconvenience of being placed on a waiting list. In addition, some patients travel to specific destinations to undergo procedures that are not available in their home country. Examples of such procedures include stem-cell transplants and gender-reassignment operations

    • Revue(s) Journal of Services Marketing (FNEGE 3)
    • Phil Klaus
    • Direction d'une numéro spécial d'une revue académique classée
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    Customer Experience Dynamics

    • Revue(s) Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services - FNEGE 3
    • Phil Klaus
    • Direction d'une numéro spécial d'une revue académique classée
    • Création & Innovation
    • 2019

    In Transition: Service Research Opportunities for An Aging Society

    • Revue(s) Journal of Services Marketing, FNEGE Rang 3