Call for Papers for a Special Issue on “More than just making nice:  Trust in B-to-B Relationships”

Advances in Business Marketing and Purchasing (ABMP) Book Series

The deadline is July 4, 2017 for full paper submissions

 

Trust is more than just making nice.  Trust plays a crucial role in all societies.  The Economist (August, 2016) highlights that “even the most trivial commercial transactions rely on small acts of trust” and that more complex partnerships, impelled in particular by globalization and the extended enterprise, require much higher degrees of trust in order to succeed and more broadly spur the economic activities.  Trust is the subject of a great deal of B-to-B research in marketing. However, despite its apparent value, the concept remains largely under-researched—worthy of deeper analysis (Gundlach & Cannon, 2010) and better understanding (Lilien, 2015).  Examination of conditions that give rise to trust development, maintenance, and erosion is necessary as well as the study of various forms of trust (e.g., calculative, cognitive, and affective).  Trust links in disparate contexts need examination—including business networks, intercultural and challenging ones.  Scant relevant literature supports the perspective that the affective form of trust, especially in B-to-B contexts, has retained little attention to date. Relatedly, despite the general consensus that trust changes over time, the antecedents and stages of building, maintaining, breaking and also repairing trust over time deserve more understanding.  The associations and mechanisms between interpersonal trust and inter-organizational trust in inter-firm relationships as well as how trust at one level of analysis affects and is affected by trust at other levels of analysis require deep investigation (Fang, 2008). Finally given that 94 percent of B-to-B buyers conduct online research at some point in the buying process (Accenture study, 2014), cultivating trust with new technologies including in business to business electronic commerce becomes paramount for high sale effectiveness. New technologies that encourage co-operation contribute to trust building rather than weaken it (The Economist, August 2016).

 

This special issue invites unique contributions sharing advanced concepts and tools immediately applicable to theory and practice in B2B Relationships.  Suitable topics include but are not limited to:

  • The specific determinants of Trust forms, that is, calculative, cognitive and affective trust, their distinction and links
  • The key factors and relationship stages of building, maintaining, breaking and repairing trust
  • The conceptualisations of trust across levels and their theoretical and managerial perspectives
  • The link between interpersonal trust and inter-organizational trust in inter-firm relationships
  • Trust in highly challenging buyer-seller relationships
  • Trust in B-to-B Self-Services Technologies (SST)
  • The roles of trust in fostering interpersonal and inter-organizational cooperation, especially in the following contexts: stage of the relation, intercultural and cross-border exchanges
  • The implications of trust on the deployment of more or less customers’ interaction management, customer relationship upgrading, or customer win-back capabilities
  • The implications of trust for the theory (transaction cost economics, the resource-based view and its various extensions (e.g., knowledge-based view, and dynamic capability view, relational capital)
  • Trust between members of Business/Social networks
  • Trust and new B-to-B technology.

Paper submission

Submitted papers should not have been previously published nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. (Nota bene: Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper was not originally copyrighted and if it has been completely re-written).

All papers are refereed through a double-blind peer review process.   By the deadline, July 4, 2017, Submit your paper directly to all three Guest Editors:  Houcine Akrout (INSEEC Business School, Paris:  hakrout@inseec.com ), Lars Huemer (BI Norwegian Business School:  lars.huemer@bi.no ), Karine Raies (INSEEC Business School, Lyon): kraies@inseec.com).

Authors interested to submit to this special issue are requested to review author Guidelines at this link.

References

Accenture study (2014). New technologies with make society richer by cultivating trust. https://www.accenture.com/t20150624T211502__w__/us-en/_acnmedia/Accenture/ConversionAssets/DotCom/Documents/Global/PDF/Industries_15/Accenture-B2B-Procurement-Study.pdf.

The Economist, August 2016. http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21705831-new-technologies-will-make-society-richer-cultivating-trust-believing-seeing.

Fang E., Palmatier R.W., Scheer L.K. and Li N. (2008), Trust at different organizational levels, Journal of Marketing, 72, 80-98.

Gundlach, G. T., & Cannon, J. P. (2010). Trust but verify? The performance implications of verification strategies in trusting relationships. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 38(4), 399-417.

Lilien, G. (2015). The B2B knowledge gap. Paper presented at the EMAC May 2015 conference.